Michelle Farabough's blog

Is web 2.0 communication? Can it be?

Today started out like most Mondays. You know, "Monday Monday"...

The one bright spot was taking a break to support a fellow colleague at the ACRL-OK conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Her (Linda Summers) poster presentation on libraries and blogging as a way to COMMUNICATE with patrons caught the eye and attention of keynote speaker David Silver.

KM = (K)eep (M)oving. Are KMers Imagineers?

I can't help but see a strong correlation between Walt Disney's "keep moving" culture and good KM:

Old school or new? Memorize or retrieve?

I'm struggling. Which is most important for a fifth-grader:  1.) to carry in one's head the obscure facts that unlike the Cherokee Indians, the Iroquois lived in longhouses and ate roots or  2.) to aquire the skill to evaluate and select authoritative online information  from websites like http://www.nativeamericans.com/ in order to access that type of information when needed?

Metacrap happens

Today has been a surreal experience about metadata, classification and cataloging... basically how we find information or enable information to be found so we can use it. (Isn't that just another way to define communication?)

"Communication" is often lost in a "to do" list

The word "communication" seems an unusual thread for an entire 2-day symposium addressing the latest research and methods for a combined knowledge and project management initiative. I'm never sure whether it's because of my experience in mass communication, my belief that knowledge management is really communication management, or just because I love to communicate with others... that I am hypersensitive to when someone "throws out" the word "communication" in their presentation.

Knowledge synthesis

What happens when you mix project management and knowledge management?

A super symposium, a room full of bright people and novel ideas, and an awareness that brings organizations to a new level of excitement about how to capitalize on their most important asset: it's people.

Do you know what you know?

Is a little known bit of information significant? Could it be a clue that solves the big picture? And how do we know what we know? Can we share knowledge if we can't recognize it... if we think it's just too insignificant?

KM and learning: separated at birth?

Today I tried to learn Dreamweaver. Wow! What an experience. It took me 7 hours and two large mochas to get past lesson number 2. But tennacity paid off. I DID learn how to create a home page AND link to pages, link to return email and link to a URL.

Through this experience I found myself not unlike one of the students of knowledge on the steps of the gathering place at the School of Athens... trying to pick up any tips I can about web design and even moreso, advice about how to be a good learner.

Imitation or theft? Is OSS the epitome of knowledge sharing?

I'm bringing to the home page my recent addition to The Art of Knowledge Management page, as it truly is a debate of merit for this blog: Picasso and Open Source Software

The Art of Questioning

To truly "communicate", there must be shared meaning... And sometimes that means clarification... And to get there, one often needs to ask questions.

Checking in with our philosophers from the School of Athens, today I turn to Socrates, whose pupils included Artistotle and Plato. According to changing minds.org, "Socrates was one of the greatest educators who taught by asking questions and thus drawing out (as 'ex duco', meaning to 'lead out', which is the root of 'education') answers from his pupils."