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Oft times knowledge comes in disguise

Sometimes it's our lack of knowledge, that when put into a new framework, becomes knowledge that is real. And valuable. And lasting. And most beneficial to Self and others in our communities of practice.  Other times it's in our failures that knowledge emerges as motivation and the needed realization that what matters most is progress, not perfection.

Knowledge can be painful. Knowledge can arrive unexpectedly. Knowledge can be a gift from our colleagues and our friends.

If nothing else, aren't knowledge managers truly archivists?

Today's thoughts were sparked by the newly released First Monday paper entitled "Machines in the archives: Technology and the coming transformation of archival reference" by Richard J. Cox and the University of Pittsburgh archives students. In the article personal computers are recognized as the catalyst for the transformation, allowing a narrowing of the gap between past and present.

Managing Knowledge

Recently, I've been VERY busy managing knowledge--MY OWN! All my creative and reflective thoughts have been pre-empted by a gazillion projects, and an attempt to learn Dreamweaver and design the ICKM 2008 website. This year Thanksgiving comes December 8 at my house!

Currently, I'm writing a paper which discusses the differences between Zipf's theory of Least Effort and Marcia Bates theory of Berrypicking as they relate to online searching.  As far as communication and knowledge management is concerned... I AM Just Communicating!

Is web 2.0 communication? Can it be?

Today started out like most Mondays. You know, "Monday Monday"...

The one bright spot was taking a break to support a fellow colleague at the ACRL-OK conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Her (Linda Summers) poster presentation on libraries and blogging as a way to COMMUNICATE with patrons caught the eye and attention of keynote speaker David Silver.

KM = (K)eep (M)oving. Are KMers Imagineers?

I can't help but see a strong correlation between Walt Disney's "keep moving" culture and good KM:

Old school or new? Memorize or retrieve?

I'm struggling. Which is most important for a fifth-grader:  1.) to carry in one's head the obscure facts that unlike the Cherokee Indians, the Iroquois lived in longhouses and ate roots or  2.) to aquire the skill to evaluate and select authoritative online information  from websites like http://www.nativeamericans.com/ in order to access that type of information when needed?

Metacrap happens

Today has been a surreal experience about metadata, classification and cataloging... basically how we find information or enable information to be found so we can use it. (Isn't that just another way to define communication?)

"Communication" is often lost in a "to do" list

The word "communication" seems an unusual thread for an entire 2-day symposium addressing the latest research and methods for a combined knowledge and project management initiative. I'm never sure whether it's because of my experience in mass communication, my belief that knowledge management is really communication management, or just because I love to communicate with others... that I am hypersensitive to when someone "throws out" the word "communication" in their presentation.

Knowledge synthesis

What happens when you mix project management and knowledge management?

A super symposium, a room full of bright people and novel ideas, and an awareness that brings organizations to a new level of excitement about how to capitalize on their most important asset: it's people.

Do you know what you know?

Is a little known bit of information significant? Could it be a clue that solves the big picture? And how do we know what we know? Can we share knowledge if we can't recognize it... if we think it's just too insignificant?